Bursting the Bubble

Be it children or adults, all of us fancy (our own!) bubbles. While the bubbles of children are relatively simpler (though there could be exceptions), the same is not true for adults. So here is my multidimensional take on bubbles and the different connotations associated with bursting them.

Have you seen toddlers chasing bubbles? It is both an entertaining and amusing sight to witness. Barely able to stand on their feet, toddlers get excited at the sight of the floating bubbles around them and try to not just catch them, but pop them too! The smile on the face after bursting the bubble is worth a million dollars. The fact that it is human nature to burst bubbles (of all kinds!!) is exhibited at a very early age. It is said that this innocent activity of chasing bubbles helps both the gross and fine motor skills. For the toddler though bursting bubbles is just a game. The complexity associated with bubbles is directly proportional to age.

Though the toddler grows in to a child the fondness for bubbles does not decrease. In fact, bubble making wands are considered a perfect return gift in birthday parties. As the child grows and enters into teens, it is the other bubble that catches their attention – the bubble gum. Chewing the bubble gum and then blowing bubbles is perceived as being very ‘cool’! I personally detest the sight of any one chewing gum especially during the course of any serious activity. It inevitably reminds me of a cud-chewing buffalo. However, whatever my personal beliefs may be, you would find many youngsters chewing gum and then blowing out bubbles.

Many sportspersons chew gum, apparently, to concentrate and relieve stress. There are world championships and records for blowing bubbles out of the chewed (bubble) gum. I will have to grudgingly admit here that the only time I have chewed gum (and not bubble gum, mind you!!) is on flights. Chewing gum during take off and touchdown on a flight helps to relieve earache.

School to Life Transition, Fine liners and Girlies by Bursting The Bubble •  A podcast on Anchor
Image Courtesy : https://anchor.fm/

Having talked about the real and tangible bubbles, it is perhaps time to talk about the intangible bubbles that we all tend to live in. These are the bubbles that are difficult to burst. The metaphorical meaning of the bubble is our comfort zone, our world views, our beliefs and perceptions that we cling on to. This bubble though imaginary is perhaps the most impregnable. Sudden upheavals in life burst these bubbles and sometimes leave us distraught. Out of our popped bubbles we emerge with altered perceptions of life and go on to blow up other bubbles. This process of blowing bubbles around us is incessant. Only the shape, size and the life span of the bubbles are different each time.

You'll never pop bubble wrap again after this episode of 'Doctor Who' -  Entertainment
Image Courtesy :https://in.mashable.com/

Well, to end on a lighter note, the bubbles I like to burst the most are those of the bubble wrap packing. Any one who has not indulged in this activity has missed out on a lot of fun. Bubble wrap packing is used for packing fragile articles. For me the wrapper is as important (if not more) as the article itself. Bursting these bubbles is pure bliss. And mind you, it is addictive. I just cannot rest until I have burst the last bubble. Searching desperately for the one last bubble that has not yet been burst is pretty gratifying. In fact, my daughter and I actually cut the wrap into pieces so that we have our very own bubbles of joy to burst. The sound of the popping bubble is like music to my ears. Thankfully, there are some bubbles that can be burst with ease and happiness!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started
%d bloggers like this: